Tag Archives: gottakeepwriting

The Writer’s Sword

I was talking a few weeks ago with the wonderful Adrian about….something…and we somehow got onto a writer’s sword…

(I just had to look up the conversation. It was to do with whacking said wonderful person with something when he gets too big-headed about his imminent fame).

Anyway. It got both of us thinking, and I ended up coming up with this motto;

The Writer’s Sword: skill blended with ego, tempered by humility.

I’ve been thinking over the past few weeks about the balance that’s needed to be a writer. It’s a bit of an odd one – you do need all three elements listed above, and all in roughly equal measures.

Skill’s the one that is most easily learned, I think, and yet the hardest to gain. It’s no surprise that the writer’s advice is most often “write, write, write” – practise really does make perfect, or at least lets you make all the mistakes you can! And if you want to get published consistently, you have to have that skill, and use it consistently.

And this feeds into ego. You have to believe that you’re good! You also have to recognise that while other writers might be better than you, while you might not yet be perfect or a bestseller or whatever your personal vision of “A Writer” is, you’re in your own class of excellence. Only you can write how you do. Only you can see the world as you do, and translate that into words. Only you can tell the stories. You might not be as good as you want to be, but damnit, you’ve got some talent there!

But…that has to be tempered with humility. Critique can be soul-destroying, and it’s a harsh thing to have to accept that the work you thought was amazing might need polish. It’s frustrating as hell to have something come back with metaphorical red pen all over it, especially when you feel you poured yourself into it. Writing is personal and it is hard, and to put it out into the world, get it trodden on – either by your editor or your readers (or by the lack of them) can hurt. You need to be able to roll with those punches.

And then we’re back round to skill and ego. You have to have the skill to accept the critique and work what you learn back into your writing, to get better – and the ego to survive the criticism and put your work back out there!

It’s something I’ve been watching in myself over the past few years – from the original work I did on Shadows In The Light (with its…ooh, about five revisions, improving each time) and then GreenSky, over the course of ten books. I wouldn’t write Green Sky & Sparks in the same way now as I did ten years ago – but then my work now is very, very different! Even The Necromancer’s Charm is looking very different to No Man’s Land, and that’s only got two years between them.

The sword keeps getting stronger over time, the more you write, and my blade gets more and more honed for every word I write, every change I make.

What metaphors have you got for the balance that’s needed for writing?

Ok, it’s a Series

I’ve been thinking about The Necromancer’s Charm (my 1920’s necromacy mafia thing) that started off as a novel and then went to two and maybe three.

I’m trying to turn it into four.

What the hell, brain?

But I started scribbling a few more formal ideas, and titling stuff. And I realised that I had “The Vigilante” and “The Queen” and “The War” and…well, it looks like I might have enough overarching plotline and romance to be able to keep a running thread.

I also started trying to plot out the books in terms of the problem they’re solving. I want three main problems in each book; one necromancy (as the main character is a necromancer), one political, and one romantic. Obviously there are going to be other problems in there, and at the moment, I think I’m going to overlap some of the problems – just so you have to keep reading!

I’m actually plotting these books! It’s scary, but it’s going to be great.

I also randomly messaged Adrian with the following. Luckily he knows I’m insane!

“Idea for my vigilante character. Real life she fights crime. Secret life, she’s a reporter. This is going to be fun!”

Planning for NaNo 2017

I’m going to write The Thief & The Seer for NaNoWriMo 2017!

I think the name’s officially changed back…I was considering “As Old As My Eyes” or heart or soul, but whenever I talk about it, it’s become “Thief & Seer” so I may as well stick with that. Plus, it tells you what the novel’s about!

My reason for picking Thief & Seer over The Necromancer’s Charm (which is my 1920’s urban fantasy) is that I want to set them in the same world, although NC is about 400 years later. So, I need the world. While I have some ideas for NC, I don’t really know too much about the world that it’s set in yet, so….

I get to write Thief & Seer to find out!

I’ve got the characters, and a basic plot. Beyond that, I think it’s a perfect NaNo novel – I can incorporate a lot of the prompts if I need to, hit people with shovels, go off on tangents…my aim is really to get a complete novel by the end of November, and then I can build the world out from that.

That does mean I need to aim for more than 50k during NaNo, though. 70k is 2300 ish words a day.

Hmmm.

This could be fun!

 

A cozy chair and a crime-solving ferret

I’m currently putting together a short story for submission to Death By Cupcake by Elm Books

Imagine yourself in your favorite chair. There’s a cat in your lap, a fire in the fireplace, and on the little table at your elbow, your favorite hot drink. The book in your hand is a cozy.

A cozy is a mystery, which, of course, means a tale of crime and intrigue. Often that crime is murder. But although the circumstances surrounding the crime can be ugly, that ugliness—as well as any attendant sex, violence, or cruelty–takes place offstage. Instead, the crime is treated as a puzzle, and the sleuth, a charming amateur, is the hero.

Many cozies take place in small, pleasant towns. Many have female sleuths. Quite a few are organized around themes, such as crafts, hobbies, food, or pets. If your mystery has a recipe or a crime-solving ferret, it’s a cozy, and we’d like to see it.

It just caught my imagination, and I think I can get a story based in my current world! I’ve found that it’s a really good way to play with my concepts – No Man’s Land came out of a short, and I do like letting things just run without needing to plot for an entire novella (or novel). So far I’m going down the murder mystery route, although I’m currently lacking a motive. I’m sure one will turn up!

I’ve got a secret door, a scandalous kilt, a necromancer, a mafia don, a murder (obviously), and some other little things that I’m not going to spill quite yet…although no ferret, yet. But I think it’s going to be fun!