Review: Wonderland

Wonderland, edited by Marie O’Regan and Paul Kane

From the greatest names in fantasy and horror comes an anthology of stories inspired by Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Join Alice as she is thrown into the whirlwind of Wonderland

Within these pages you’ll find myriad approaches to Alice, from horror to historical, taking us from the nightmarish reaches of the imagination to tales that will shock, surprise and tug on the heart-strings. So, it’s time now to go down the rabbit hole, or through the looking-glass or… But no, wait. By picking up this book and starting to read it you’re already there, can’t you see?

Brand-new works from the best in fantastical fiction.

This anthology is a wonderful mix of excellent stories, all themed around Alice in Wonderland/Through The Looking Glass, but ranging from Westerns to sci-fi to horror to surreal to sweet.

The first story is a poem, Alice in Armor by Jane Yolen – a good starting poem about a warrior Alice, preparing for the battles of Wonderland!

Wonders Never Cease by Robert Shearman is a modern-world story of what happened after Alice came back; it’s a very good and well-themed study of the very practical, hard-hearted and chilly Alice in a modern world, with a child! She always seems very uncaring in Carroll’s stories, and Shearman brings it out wonderfully. Several of the other stories present real-world Alices, or look at how Wonderland affects them: in Good Dog, Alice by Juliet Maeillier a child with a new dog finds Wonderland, and it helps her with a real-world problem; and George Mann’s About Time is a sweet story about childhood and facing your monsters. Six Impossible Things by Mark Chadbourne makes lovely use of some real-life moments from Alice, mixed with a dose of Cheshire Cat surreal; and Vanished Summer Glory by Rio Youers is about psychoanalysing the Rabbit… and dreaming of vanished youth and those long gone. Alison Littlewood’s Eat Me, Drink Me is a surreal story of growing up, childhood, death, change – and also, as the title suggests, makes liberal use of Alice’s strange Wonderland experience.

There’s a brilliant range of genres in the book, too. In MR Carey’s There Were No Birds To Fly, Wonderland meets the apocalypse; what happens when wonderland comes into the real world? Smoke ‘Em If You’ve Got ‘Em by Angela Slatter is a Wonderland-meets-Western take on a hunter, chasing a fugitive. Temp Work by Lillith Saintcrow is about a futuristic spy/assassin infiltrating a party – it’s a twisted, dark world of technology and broken things, but still has some hope, and it’s definitely a favourite story. LL McKinney’s What Makes A Monster is a Victoriana lady duo fighting monsters that get through into this world; The Night Parade by Laura Mauro is a haunting, surreal horror about rescuing a child from Wonderland – but if the parade of monsters sees you, and not everything is as it seems… The White Queen’s Dictum by James Lovegrove is a lovely, sad and haunting story about believing six impossible things, including ghosts; and my favourite story, The White Queen’s Pawn by Genevieve Cogman, is a spy-thriller style about someone trying to train as an agent, and getting far more than they bargained for…

Some of the stories make lovely use of Carroll’s language and characters; Cavan Scott’s Dream Girl is a very weird, wonderful Wonderland absurdity with a nice twist at the end, and The Hunting of the Jabberwock by Jonathan Green is a story of the young adventurer out to kill the jabberwock, and a story about morals and humanity into the bargain, and is full of wonderful jabberwocky language too. How I Comes To Be The Treacle Queen by Cat Rambo has a really fun voice, and a story about liberation and freedom – and treacle – and in Black Kitty by Catriona Ward, we see the two Queens growing up, and their separated mother trying to tempt them from their father… until the magic goes wrong. Or right?

The final poem is Jane Yolen’s Revolution In Wonder – dark and full of nursery and Wonderland-inspired tales, flipped onto their heads!

Overall; a wonderful and surreal mix of stories, bound together by Alice’s experience, and all using different aspects. A fun, surprising and interesting collection.