Review: The Ten Thousand Doors of January

The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

EVERY STORY OPENS A DOOR

In a sprawling mansion filled with peculiar treasures, January Scaller is a curiosity herself. As the ward of the wealthy Mr. Locke, she feels little different from the artifacts that decorate the halls: carefully maintained, largely ignored and utterly out of place.

But her quiet existence is shattered when she stumbles across a strange book. A book that carries the scent of other worlds and tells a tale of secret doors, of love, adventure and danger. Each page reveals more impossible truths about the world, and January discovers a story increasingly entwined with her own.

I have loved Alix Harrow’s writing ever since reading one of her short stories (I’ll remember the name at 4am, don’t worry…) and grabbed the book eagerly when I saw it at FantasyCon! And it’s definitely, definitely worth the read.

It’s a story about a girl trying to find out who she is and where she comes from… and about trying to find her father and mother… and trying to find the way home… and opening and closing doors, and how stories fit into those, and how treasures fit into all of it, and why danger and adventure keeps chasing her around. The book is told between two perspectives, one of which is January’s, and both keep tugging you along to read as you want to know what happens next in both!

It’s also got some wonderful quotes about stories and writing and imagination; Lyndsie Manusos has done an excellent selection over on BookRiot, but I think my favourite is;

Worlds were never meant to be prisons, locked and suffocating and safe. Worlds were supposed to be great ramblings houses with all the windows thrown open and the wind and summer rain rushing through them, with magic passages in their closets and secret treasure chests in their attics.

So basically; if you like words and stories and adventures and beautiful writing, read this.