All posts by kate

About kate

Kate Coe is an editor, book reviewer and writer of fiction & fantasy. She writes the sparkpunk GreenSky series and blogs at writingandcoe.co.uk. When she's not working, she fills her spare time in between writing with web design, gaming, geeky cross-stitch and DIY (which may or may not involve destroying things). She also reads far fewer books that she would like to, but possibly more than she really has time for.

MAP COLOUR MAP COLOUR MAP!!

Fiiiiiiinished! It’s a map of the GreenSky Worlds by the astonishing Tom Parker, and I adore it.

Colour map of the Greensky Fantasy world

We’re planning on adding it to the current GreenSky books (six in total) plus having it in the remaining four!

Now, a quick tour…? If you want to see more of Meton and the mountains, try Green Sky & Sparks – which, incidentally, is 99p in the UK and $1.99 in the US! Aleric, the Plains and Meton are Grey Stone & Steel and High Flight & Flames.

Any of the following can be read as stand-alones, so if you want more of The Mage’s Centre, Derah and Aden (and the oceans) try Salt Winds & Wandering; Tao and a murder mystery is Empty Skies & Sunlight.  Huish and the desert is Desert Sands & Silence, and there will be more desert – and more exploring! – in the seventh book, Far Heights & Horizons.

The eighth will be the desert between Reyan and Torth; the ninth is the forest around the Mage’s Centre and Belmont; and the final is back to Meton, and some familiar faces.

So – thank you to Tom for doing the map: it’s been a ridiculously fun experience and I can’t recommend Tom’s skill and professionalism enough, along with his fantastic drawing style! I hope everyone who reads the new books is going to enjoy being able to see the places they’re reading about!

A Quick Kate Update: July 2019

This Is How You Lose The Time War is now out (wheee!)

Peter Cat got himself hurt on something on Sunday, which meant a worrying trip to the vets and a very fetching bandana, and also a rather large vet’s bill. Yay. He’s now home and Very Grumpy that we won’t let him outside… I don’t think anyone’s broken it to him yet that he’s not allowed out for two weeks. He’s going to be Exceedingly Grumpy at that point! However, he is fairly stylish in a bandana-bandage sort of thing, and is being more affectionate to everyone in the hopes this will bribe us into opening a door for him. (It hasn’t worked yet.)

Uncanny Magazine and Strange Horizons both have Kickstarters on at the moment – consider supporting excellent writing! (I really need to get my budget for writing magazines sorted… there’s so many I want to subscribe to!)

At the moment I’m reading The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter, and it’s one of the first things I’ve enjoyed outside work for a while – I’ve had a bit of a reading slump so it’s nice to want to read something.

My curtains are currently moving strangely. I think this is due to the Small Black Fluff on my windowsill, staring intently at passers-by.

I’m using Drops to learn Norwegian; while I’m mostly building up vocab at the moment, it has a strong insistence on being able to say “I am allergic to peanut butter” and that I know the words for “body”, “umbrella” and “goodbye”. I am wondering at what point I need to ask it if it’s ok. (The app is actually very good; it drips new vocabulary in and uses images instead of English words, plus it’s very easy to use. Currently doing twenty minutes a day!)

I am still ridiculously lacking in motivation… not been doing great recently, so that’s been fun. It feels a bit like wading through treacle? I had a conversation with my partner about anti-depressants, anyhow, which I Do Not Want To Go Back On but if the swings get too bad then I may. We’ll see.

And finally: the groan that goes around the Editorial Team when someone risks asking, “So, is this a series…?” confirms this meme!

Inspiration from the Internet

In a creepy or not-creepy vein, however you want to take this…

It reminded me of the line in one of the Science of Discworld books, when Ponder Stibbons suggests that the scientists could record speakers and then future generations could listen to their ideas; “Listen to the voices of dead men?” says the scientist, outraged. Just a reminder that there’s always other voices in those spaces between things…