Tag Archives: creativewriting

Writing in Amsterdam

I would just like to say that I love this city! We’re staying in the Generator, and I’m currently sitting on a sofa with 80’s music, nachos, fresh mint tea (aka. “we picked mint, dumped it in a glass and poured hot water on it – enjoy!”) and I’m actually writing! Guys, I’m writing!

We were out this morning (hence the late blog post) but now I’ve got some chill time, I’ve got my laptop out. I have three things on my list for this week:

Finish GreenSky Book 10. For whatever reason, my head is refusing to write GreenSky when I’m in England. Away, however…when I was in Florence I finished two books, and so far, I’ve managed a thousand words in about half an hour. If I suddenly get a multi-million deal to write more GreenSky, I’m going to have to put “must write in a foreign city” in my contract.

Read the last novel on my official edit pile. I have had this since May and I’ve just been crap with it. I need to have time to sit down and focus…which I’ve definitely got! So that’s a major thing.

Write a short story. Last time I was here, I was challenged to write a soppy romance. This time, my travelling companion has picked “thriller” – and we’ve spent most of the morning wondering how I could get the city into it! Dramatic bike chase, anyone? My only thing is that I have to mostly stay within the constraints of the genre – so I can’t be too sarcastic. Considering I am thoroughly cynical about thrillers, this could be a problem…

So that’s my holiday so far, and it’s only the first day! Anyway, I’m off to drink my tea and finish this damn GreenSky book. Only a couple of thousand words to go…

The Writer’s Workout

I woke up from a dream in which I was participating in a new type of contest. Half Nanowrimo (is that spelled right?), half 30 Days to Better Abs, the challenge was called THE WRITER’S WORKOUT.

Doesn’t this sound like the best idea? It’s from a post by Alison Tyler, who is awesome. She’s got some amazing writing up on her Patreon (including the rest of the post above) and it’s definitely worth following her if you like words, smut, erotica and side-tracks about anything and everything.

Also, while on the same subject, Kate Leth (who did Kate or Die if you’ve come across that) also has an awesome Patreon with comics, thoughts and general chaos. Check ’em out!

 

 

 

Empty Skies & Sunlight is published!

empty skies coverIf you haven’t read the first book, Green Sky & Sparks, then you’re in luck – the Kindle edition is just 99p at the moment!

Empty Skies & Sunlight is the fifth book in the GreenSky sparkpunk series, and you can get hold of it from today in Kindle or paperback.

When Anoé Meerla is given the chance to escape a war-torn city with her daughter, she accepts an assignment to find missing people on the beautiful islands of Tao. But she finds more problems than she expected waiting for her; a Floating Island that roams the waves, a Mage trying to forget a war, an old lover with plans of his own, and a tangled web of runaways and murder – and there’s her daughter to protect as well.

And if you want to hear an excerpt, have a listen to the Bristol Fringe podcast for a teaser!

Motivation and Getting On With It

I was trying to work out today what motivates me to write. I’m in a bit of a slump at the moment – I’m not feeling inspired and struggling to motivate myself, despite having time to actually write (and read, and research…)

It’s not finishing something. That’s great, but it doesn’t give me a satisfaction, doesn’t give me a buzz; it’s just another step, because I know that even if I’ve finished something, then I’ve gotta send it to a reader and then edit and then re-edit and then…it’s just another step in the process.

Wordcount doesn’t motivate me, either. It always feels too close to the NaNo 50k or bust thing; it doesn’t matter if they’re good words, just words. And frankly, that just annoys me, because if I write shit words then I’ll just end up rewriting, so what’s the point? I can appreciate that it’s good at some stages of a writing journey, but for me, I’d rather not write than write shit that I’m just going to have to redo later.

Ideas? Sure, I have a few things that I think “hey, that’d make a great story”…but unless it’s there, it’s got the inspiration behind it, then it just sits. I’ve got quite a lot of snippets and odd fragments of story that have never got further than that “hey, that’s a cool idea” stage.

So what does motivate me? I guess, as far as I can work out, it’s getting the voices out of my head. It’s writing a story that needs to be told. I can have a great idea, but it needs to live. I need the characters in my head. I have no idea what the process is that puts them there, but it’s something I try to make sure I have it when I write.

So…at this stage, I guess the best I can do is just keep going. I’m re-reading my work in progress(es), trying to see if I can continue with any of them even with my current slump. I think there’s one that I can continue, so…

This freakin’ sucks. But hey, such is a writer’s life with a screwey brain. Some days, I have everyone shouting in my head – other days, I just get tumbleweed.

Snippet of an Idea

This one’s from a colleague at work – “I send my books out into the universe”.

On space-ships. Through portals. On the colony transporters carrying thousands of sleeping passengers. On the cargo freighters picking up minerals from the asteroid belts and ice from the far-out moons before beginning their run back. On the orbiting stations above alien planets, circling above long-dead surfaces. On tiny skimmers flitting across the planet’s surface, darting there and back again.

The paper has been well-thumbed – maybe enough that you now have to wear gloves, or use a tool to turn the pages, so that you don’t wear the print off for someone else. There’s a box, or a shelf, or an alcove on every vessel; crammed with the crew’s choices, their precious sheets. There’s always someone amongst the team who knows how to repair a binding, or can coax the printer to spit out new pages to paste between the worn plastic covers. They are treasured, patched and repaired, bound and bandaged, to be read and worn down again and again.

They read in their bunks. In the long hours between asteroids. In the silence of the stars. In the howling storms of alien worlds, the bright sunshine of the galaxies, the darkness of space. On new worlds, deep under the crust or in new settlements on the hills, high above the surface or somewhere on the endless ice-plains. They read between customers at the dive-bars on the docking-station, before starting the day fishing on the narrow seas, after crossing unimaginable distances and back again.

No matter where they travel, stories go with them, and the scraps of paper and plastic are a better dimension to other worlds than any they can imagine in their own.